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Building IRs - Protect

Q: How do I build a trustworthy IR?

It is necessary to take active measures to protect your digital content from loss that can take the form of changes, obsolescence, inappropriate access, and disasters.  One of the first lines of defense is to make multiple copies of your content and store them in different locations.  Depending on the resources you have available, you should make at least two copies of your content, and optimally six copies. You should also monitor your content for inadvertent or deliberate changes by performing checksum procedures that can detect and alert you to even the smallest changes in the digital objects in your collection.  Obsolescence -- or the state of having content in out of date file formats that is difficult to access with available software -- can be avoided by preemptively developing policies to address this issue. These policies can involve choosing to collect only content in preservation friendly file formats, planning to migrate your content to viable file formats as technology changes, and/or planning to utilize emulation software to provide access to your content over time.  As you are developing your policies during the Prepare stage, you should be sure to also prepare a policy for both technological and physical disaster preparedness. 

Explore

  • Digital Curation Centre (DCC) "Repository Audit and Assessment" [Link]

"The DCC has produced a list of online tools and methodologies for the audit, assessment, and certification of digital repositories."

The DCC has produced a list of online tools and methodologies for the audit, assessment and certification of digital repositories. - See more at: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/repository-audit-and-assessment/repositor...

The DCC has produced a list of online tools and methodologies for the audit, assessment and certification of digital repositories. - See more at: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/repository-audit-and-assessment/repository-audit-and-assessment#sthash.IGiMjejb.dpuf
The DCC has produced a list of online tools and methodologies for the audit, assessment and certification of digital repositories.  - See more at: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/repository-audit-and-assessment/repository-audit-and-assessment#sthash.IGiMjejb.dpuf
The DCC has produced a list of online tools and methodologies for the audit, assessment and certification of digital repositories.  - See more at: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/repository-audit-and-assessment/repository-audit-and-assessment#sthash.IGiMjejb.dpufWatch

Read

  • Ferriero, David. “ISO Standards for Certifying Trustworthy Digital Repositories.” NARAtions: Blog of the Archivist of the United States. (March 15, 2011) [Link]

"NARA...hosted a meeting of the Working Group that is developing ISO (International Organization for Standardization) standards for use in certifying trustworthy digital repositories.  The two draft ISO standards are ISO/DIS 16363  – Audit and certification of trustworthy digital repositories and ISO/DIS 16919  – Requirements for bodies providing audit and certification of candidate trustworthy digital repositories."

  • Ross, Seamus and Andrew McHugh. “The Role of Evidence in Establishing Trust in Repositories.” D-Lib Magazine 12 7/8 (July/August 2006). [Link]

"This article arises from work by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) Working Group examining mechanisms to roll out audit and certification services for digital repositories in the United Kingdom. Our attempt to develop a program for applying audit and certification processes and tools took as its starting point the RLG-NARA Audit Checklist for Certifying Digital Repositories. Our intention was to appraise critically the checklist and conceive a means of applying its mechanics within a diverse range of repository environments. We were struck by the realization that while a great deal of effort has been invested in determining the characteristics of a 'trusted digital repository', far less effort has concentrated on the ways in which the presence of the attributes can be demonstrated and their qualities measured. With this in mind we sought to explore the role of evidence within the certification process, and to identify examples of the types of evidence (e.g., documentary, observational, and testimonial) that might be desirable during the course of a repository audit."

  • Trusted Digital Repositories: Attributes and Responsibilities.  Mountain View, CA: RLG, 2002. [Link

"In this report the working group has articulated a framework of attributes and responsibilities for trusted, reliable, sustainable digital repositories capable of handling the range of materials held by large and small research institutions. The framework is broad enough to accommodate different situations, architectures, and institutional responsibilities while providing a basis for the expectations of a trusted repository."

 

Last updated on 10/03/13, 11:37 am by edfoster10

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