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Digital Curation

Focus: 
Date: 
Friday, December 7, 2012 - 08:00 - 17:00

This SAA DAS workshop will take place in Austin, TX.  For more information, see

Privacy and Confidentiality Issues in Digital Archives

Focus: 
Date: 
Friday, November 30, 2012 - 09:00 - 17:00

This SAA DAS workshop will take place in Northfield, MN.  For more information, see

Appraisal of Electronic Records

Focus: 
Date: 
Monday, November 12, 2012 - 08:00 - 17:00

This SAA DAS workshop will take place in Ann Arbor, MI.  For more information, see

Preserving Digital Archives

Focus: 
Date: 
Monday, November 12, 2012 - 09:00 - 17:00

This SAA DAS workshop will take place in New York, NY.  For more information, see

Digital Curation

Focus: 
Date: 
Friday, October 26, 2012 - 08:00 - 17:00

This SAA DAS workshop will take place in New Orleans, LA.  For more information, see

Copyright Issues for Digital Archives

Focus: 
Date: 
Friday, October 26, 2012 - 09:00 - 17:00

This SAA DAS workshop will take place in Philadelphia, PA.  For more information, see

Preserving Digital Archives

Focus: 
Date: 
Friday, October 12, 2012 - 09:00 - 17:00

This SAA DAS workshop will take place in Ogden, UT.  For more information, see

Appraisal of Electronic Records

Focus: 
Date: 
Friday, October 12, 2012 - 08:00 - 17:00

This SAA DAS workshop will take place in Austin, TX.  For more information, see

Copyright Issues for Digital Archives

Focus: 
Date: 
Monday, October 15, 2012 - 09:00 - 17:00

This SAA DAS workshop will take place in Knoxville, TN.  For more information, see

Best Practices Exchange

Focus: 
Date: 
Tuesday, December 4, 2012 (All day) - Thursday, December 6, 2012 (All day)

The 7th annual BPE conference will take place in Annapolis, MD.  For more information, see http://www.bpexchange.org/.

MCN 2012 Conference

Focus: 
Date: 
Wednesday, November 7, 2012 (All day) - Saturday, November 10, 2012 (All day)

The 40th annual Museum Computer Network conference will take place in Seattle, WA.  For more information, see http://www.mcn.edu/mcn-201

DLF Forum

Focus: 
Date: 
Sunday, November 4, 2012 (All day) - Monday, November 5, 2012 (All day)

The Digital Library Federation conference will take place in Denver.  For more information, see http://www.diglib.org/forums/2012forum/.

iPRES 2012

Focus: 
Date: 
Monday, October 1, 2012 (All day) - Friday, October 5, 2012 (All day)

This 9th annual conference on digital preservation is hosted this year by the University of Toronto iSchool.  For more information, see https://ipr

Curating Digital Video - Provide

Q. How do moving image archives provide access to digital video?

The primary purpose of most digital collections is to provide user access to the information in the collection.  In order to provide access to your content, you must determine how digital content will be made accessible and who will be allowed to access it.  In order to best provide access to your users, it is important that you understand the needs of the users and their preferred methods for accessing the content you provide.  You will also have to take measures to ensure that the content you provide adheres to copyright and digital rights management laws.

 

Review use cases

  • Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound  http://www.tamisarchive.org/TAMIS_Web/TAMIS_home.html
    The Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound (TAMIS) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to collecting, preserving and providing access to the moving image and recorded sound heritage of the region.
  • National Film Preservation Board.  "Public Moving Image Archives and Research Centers."  Library of Congress.  http://www.loc.gov/film/arch.html
    Offers a regularly updated list of global moving image collections.

 

Read

 


Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Curating Digital Video - Manage

Q. What resources are available to support a digital video collection over time?

Because the landscape of digital content is continually shifting, it requires constant, active management.  Being responsible for a collection of digital content involves the continued management of not just the technology used to store, preserve, and provide access, but also the monetary and human resources.  Managing digital collections requires strong project management skills.  It requires the ability to manage relationships with all of your stakeholders including your user base, those within your department, across departments, your institutional leaders, among other institutions.  As technology changes, it is important to stay abreast of these changes and to be able to adopt new approaches and workflows as necessary.

 

Take action

  • Independent Media Arts Preservation (IMAP)  http://www.imappreserve.org/
    Offering video preservation workshops and online training to archivists and curators, Independent Media Arts Preservation, Inc. (IMAP) is a nonprofit service, education, and advocacy organization committed to the preservation of non-commercial electronic media.

 

Read

  • Dance Heritage Coalition  http://www.danceheritage.org/index.html
    A useful case study of an organization that has engaged in extensive digitization programs with video collections, the DHC "is a national alliance of institutions holding significant collections of materials documenting the history of dance.  Its mission is to preserve, make accessible, enhance and augment the materials that document the artistic accomplishments in dance of the past, present, and future."
  • JISC Digital Media.  "Moving images: Managing your digital resources."  http://www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk/movingimages/docs/category/managing-your-digital-resources/
    This section covers all aspects of organising and managing a sustainable digital video collection.  These papers are aimed at staff who will provide support for managing digital collections but also provide valuable advice to small collection owners so they can manage their digital assets.
  • JISC Digital Media.  'Systems for Managing Digital Media Collections."  http://www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk/crossmedia/advice/systems-for-managing-digital-media-collections
    Everyone's collection and context is unique, so your choice of a system (or systems) for managing your media will require a careful assessment of your needs and resources and an evaluation of the available options. This paper provides an overview of a number of different approaches to digital media management: from some very cheap and 'low-tech' approaches to much more complex and specialised solutions. 
  • Shahmohammadi, Andrea.  "Born Digital Video Preservation: A Final Report."  Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Archives, February 2011.  https://siarchives.si.edu/sites/default/files/pdfs/bornDigitalVideoPreservation2011_0.pdf
    Born‐digital videos bring about a number of multifaceted and still unanswered questions amongst archivists when discussing best‐preservation practices.  While digital audio files have gradually evolved some accepted standards from which to build a framework for preservation, this is unfortunately not the case with digital video.  Moving images are now primarily made in digital formats, and, as such, the archival community needs to better address how to preserve and make accessible incoming collections for future generations.
  • Wilson, Andrew, et al.  "Digital Moving Images and Sound Archiving Study".  Arts and Humanities Data Service, August 2006.  http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/preservation/movingpicturesandsoundarchivingfinalversion.pdf
    The way in which materials are created, particularly the technologies used, will determine how conducive the materials are to long-term preservation, and will present varied challenges to curators charged with the subsequent management and preservation of the materials.  This report include analysis and recommendations for further research.
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  VidArch at SILS  http://www.ils.unc.edu/vidarch/
    The VidArch project built on earlier work with digital video files and their surrogates, seeking ways in which to preserve a video work's context and highlighting its essence, thus making it more understandable and accessible to future generations. This project focused on developing a preservation framework for digital video context by applying it to two important digital video collections: the complete series of NASA broadcast educational videos and the complete set of juried ACM SIGCHI videos presented at annual conferences from 1983 to the present. The project addressed the important context aspect of digital preservation on both theoretical and practical fronts, which should improve archival decision-making and finding-aid creation and suggest ways to leverage technology further to make them more efficient and effective.  This site includes links to related papers, reports and demos.
  • Gray, Stephen and Angus Whyte.  "Managing Digital Video Research Data across the Curation Lifecycle."  Digital Curation Centre.  http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/curation-reference-manual/chapters-production/video-data
    Large scale digitisation efforts have broadened the range of historical collections open for educational use.  Now however these are joined by a massive increase in born-digital material.  Video as a simple digital object is increasingly challenged, as video data is tagged and augmented with interactive features.  Video raises preservation issues and unique curation challenges that will be new to many researchers.  In this chapter we consider the DCC Curation Lifecycle as a framework for managing video data through the life of a project and beyond. 
  • Lacinak, Chris.  "Accessioning & Managing File-Based Born Digital Video."  November 5, 2009. http://www.avpreserve.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/AMIA_2009_Born_Digital_Video_Post_Final.pdf
    This presentation was given at the 2009 Conference for the Association of Moving Image
    Archivists in St. Louis, Missouri on November 5th.  It takes the audience through the process of acquiring, assessing, ingesting, and managing born-digital moving image assets.  Lacinak advocates for a model of "preservation oriented production and moving from this process, where content ends up in the archive in a haphazard way to this process where the Archive is integral to the production process."

 


Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Curating Digital Video - Store

Q. What storage options exist for digital video?

Once you have selected your digital content, you will have to determine how your content should be stored for the long-term.  When you are planning for the storage of your digital content, you will need to consider cost of storage, quantity of storage devices, level of expertise necessary, partners you have or may want to work with, and the services that you want to build from what you have stored.  Also remember that in order to have accessible, sustainable digital content, you will need to create and store various kinds of metadata either with or linked to your digital content.

 

Read

  • Shahmohammadi, Andrea.  "Born-Digital Video Preservation: A Final Report."  Smithsonian Institution Archives, February 2011.  https://siarchives.si.edu/sites/default/files/pdfs/bornDigitalVideoPreservation2011_0.pdf
    Born‐digital videos bring about a number of multifaceted and still unanswered questions amongst archivists when discussing best‐preservation practices.  While digital audio files have gradually evolved some accepted standards from which to build a framework for preservation, this is unfortunately not the case with digital video.  Moving images are now primarily made in digital formats, and, as such, the archival community needs to better address how to preserve and make accessible incoming collections for future generations.
  • Naron, Stephen, David Walls and Molly Wheeler.  "Best Practices for the Digital Conversion of Dynamic Media."  August 12, 2008.  http://www.library.yale.edu/dpip/bestpractices/MediaBestPractices.doc -- link opens a Word document
    These best practices are intended to serve as a guide for understanding the principles and technological issues surrounding the digital reformatting of dynamic media.  
  • Audio-Visual Working Group.  "MXF Application Specification," Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative.  Last updated October 12, 2012.  http://www.digitizationguidelines.gov/guidelines/MXF_app_spec.html
    The Working Group is drafting an MXF Application Specification for Archiving and Preservation (AS-AP), a detailed specification for a file "wrapper," one key part of a digital file format for audio-visual preservation.  The specification includes a list of permitted encoded essences (the underlying content bitstreams) and outlines aspects of the metadata to be embedded to support long term content management. 
  • Lazorchak, Butch.  "Whither Digital Video Preservation?"  The Signal (blog), Library of Congress, July 7, 2011.  http://blogs.loc.gov/digitalpreservation/2011/07/whither-digital-video-preservation/
    Finding appropriate digital preservation file formats for audiovisual materials is not an easy task.  While much of the recorded sound preservation realm has agreed upon the viability of the broadcast wave format for sound materials, the video realm is still kind of the Wild West in that there is no broad consensus regarding what kinds of file formats or codecs are appropriate for preservation.  To help the user determine the sustainability of a digital format, the Library has created an online resource called the Sustainability of Digital Formats web site: http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/formats/.  This web resource lists hundreds of digital formats and applies a rubric to each in order to help the digital preservation professional determine if the format would be likely to be viable long term.
  • Wactlar, Howard D. and Michael G. Christel.  "Digital Video Archives: Managing Through Metadata."  Council on Library and Information Resources, April 2002.  http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub106/video.html
    This report discusses many of the emerging challenges of digital video archiving, from encoding standards to metadata, noting that "there is no broad consensus regarding what kinds of file formats or codecs are appropriate for preservation."
  • Gilmour, Ian.  "Research Report on JPEG 2000 for Video Archiving."  Media Matters Technical Report, January 17, 2007.  http://www.media-matters.net/docs/WhitePapers/IansWhitePaper.pdf
    Motion-JPEG2000 lossless data reduction is implemented as a key technology for reducing file size in storage and for reducing data rates in networked file transfer.
  • E-MELD School of Best Practice in Digital Language Documentation.  "Archival Formats for Video Digitization."  Last updated April 11, 2006.  http://emeld.org/school/classroom/video/archive.html
    As digital camcorders become more prevalent, a growing number of videos are being created in digital format on magnetic tapes, then transferred to computers.  However, there are questions about the suitability of servers for video file storage at this time.  For long-term preservation, uncompressed formats are preferred, to avoid loss of data, but uncompressed video files are extremely large.  Although uncompressed formats are optimal for archiving, compressed video formats might well be adequate for most linguistic research, since the crucial information is aural, not visual.  Whichever format is chosen for digitization, the original tape should be saved as well, because future technological advances may make it possible to re-digitize the video in a higher-quality, uncompressed format.
  • Schreibman, Susan, ed.  "Best Practice Guidelines for Digital Collections."  Office of Digital Collections and Research, University of Maryland Libraries, May 4, 2007.  http://ourdigitalworld.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/DigitizationBestPractices_Schreibman.pdf
    See section 9.0, "Digital Audio and Moving Images" (pp.36-42).  Enormous file sizes, time and labor intensive processes, and the instability of the original object all contribute to the difficulties inherent in digital reformatting of audio and moving images.  There are, however, marked advantages to the digital reformatting of audio and moving image material that can compensate for the complexity of the process.  These include fragile analog originals receiving less wear and tear due to repeated use, increased remote access to the content, improved intellectual access through appropriate metadata creation and increased flexibility for future use.
  • Electronic Arts Intermix.  "Preservation > Single-channel > Best Practices."  http://www.eai.org/resourceguide/preservation/singlechannel/bestpractices_p.html
    Each preservation project, each video work, and each institution is unique.  The works may be well cataloged or in disarray.  There may be a single, highly valuable title or hundreds of works of unknown value.  These guidelines should be approached as just that -- guidelines that will help you form a preservation strategy to suit your situation.  Perhaps more important, they will also help you understand the questions you need to ask vendors or archivists as your project moves forward.
  • EVIA Digital Archive Project  http://www.eviada.org/default.cfm

    The EVIA Digital Archive Project is a collaborative endeavor to create a digital archive of ethnographic field video for use by scholars and instructors.  The Project has been developed through the joint efforts of ethnographic scholars, archivists, librarians, technologists, and legal experts.  Beyond the primary mission of digitally preserving ethnographic field video, the EVIA Project has also invested significantly in the creation of software and systems for the annotation, discovery, playback, peer review, and scholarly publication of video and accompanying descriptions.

  • PBCore Resources  http://www.pbcoreresources.org/
    Organized as a set of specified fields that can be used in database applications, PBCore is utilized as a data model for media cataloging and asset management systems.  As a schema, it enables data exchange between media collections, systems and organizations.  [should this link to PBCore (http://pbcore.org/index.php) instead of this resources page? -- CB]

 


Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Curating Digital Video - Select

Q. What are some of the primary considerations for selecting digital video for persistent collections?

After a thorough appraisal of the digital content you have and will be acquiring, you will need to select the content you will manage and preserve.  As part of this process, you should assess your institutional and departmental mission statements and determine if the content in question fits within your mission.  You will also need to determine if the content has value to your institution, if it's feasible to preserve the content, and if you can provide reliable access of the content to your users.  Once you have determined what content you will accept and process, document the selection choices you have made as well as who is permitted access to the content.

 

Take action

  • The Art of Selecting Digital Content to Preserve workshop  http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/education/courses/artofselecting.html
    DPOE offers training workshops both online and in person on a wide range of digital preservation issues including selection and appraisal.  [On a previous page, I changed the link to the general workshops page rather than a workshop held last year -- should I keep doing the same? -- CB]

 

Read

  • Ide, Mary and Leah Weisse.  "Recommended Appraisal Guidelines for Selecting Born-Digital Master Programs for Preservation and Deposit with the Library of Congress."  May 25, 2006.  http://cn2.wnet.org/thirteen/ptvdigitalarchive/files/2009/10/appraisal-guidelines-final.pdf

    The purpose of this report is to inform the reader of the context and background to applying appraisal and selection guidelines for the long-term retention and preservation of public television programs.  This report provides an overview of archival appraisal in the analog world, reviews existing public television and other institutional appraisal guidelines including a model program of one public television station.  A general outline of the public television production process will give the reader a contextual setting for understanding the role of appraisal in the production workflow.  Finally the report will discuss recommended digital appraisal guidelines and their implications within the digital realm.  These guidelines are intended to meet the Library of Congress and public broadcasting stations’ archive and production needs, and assure that public television’s cultural heritage created in digital form will live into the future.
  • Capra, Robert G., et al.  "Selection and Context Scoping for Digital Video Collections: An Investigation of YouTube and Blogs."  JCDL '08, Pittsburgh, June 2008.  http://fredstutzman.com/papers/JCDL2008_Stutzman.pdf

    This paper describes research conducted to help inform digital curation of on-line video.  Since May 2007, the authors have been monitoring the results of 57 queries on YouTube related to the 2008 U.S. presidential election.  They report results comparing these data to blogs that point to candidate videos on YouTube and discuss the effects of query-based harvesting as a collection development strategy.
  • Library of Congress.  "Digital Audio-Visual Preservation Prototyping Projects."  Last updated August 31, 2010.  http://www.loc.gov/rr/mopic/avprot/avprhome.html

    The prototyping projects by the Library of Congress are developing approaches for the digital reformatting of moving image and recorded sound collections as well as studying issues related to "born-digital" audio-visual content.  The projects include explorations of the scanning of motion picture film and the reformatting of video recordings from tape to digital files.
  • Cameron, Ann. "Capturing Moving Images Online."  The Indexer 24 no. 3 (April 2005): 142-44. http://www.theindexer.org/files/24-3.pdf#page=28 (subscription required to access this resource)

    ‘Archive Live’, the online catalogue from Scottish Screen Archive, brings the film and video material in Scotland’s National Moving Image Collection to life on the web.  Designed to service the general public and the commercial programme maker, the catalogue is an essential reference tool, offering detailed information about moving images from 1895 to the present day.  This article describes the planning and decision-making processes involved in actually getting the catalogue online, and provides a look at cataloguing and indexing practice in a film archive.

 


Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Curating Digital Video - Identify

Q. How are digital moving image media represented and identified?

An important part of managing your digital collections is identifying what you everything that you are working with.  This includes identifying what digital content you have, what you are already preserving, and what content you may be acquiring.  You will also need to identify the file formats you have and assess the risk associated with these formats.  The first step in this is to know what physical media you have and how to access the digital information that it stores.

 

Take action

  • Library of Congress.  "Digital Preservation Outreach & Education workshops."  http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/education/courses/index.html
    As repository managers will tell you, managing, preserving and creating access to digital rich media audio and video files presents a complex set of challenges for administrators, content creators and users.  These workshops offer an overview of metadata and formats including the complexity of video metadata, and the challenges posed by those complexities, and a general overview of video in repositories.


 

Read

  • Archival Moving Image Materials: A Cataloging Manual.  2nd ed. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, 2000.  http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/amimupd.html
    This web site provides updates to the 2000 edition, which is only available for purchase as a part of Cataloger's Desktop at http://www.loc.gov/cds/howtoorder.html.
  • Rutgers University Libraries.  "Moving Image Collections."  Last updated July 22, 2003.  http://gondolin.rutgers.edu/MIC/
    Moving Image Collections (MIC) is an integrated online catalog of moving images held by a variety of organizations, including libraries, museums, archives and television broadcasting companies.  The goal of the Moving Image Collections portal is to provide a window to the world's moving image collections for educators, researchers, exhibitors, and the general public that also allows preservationists to collaborate in describing and maintaining this unique cultural resource and thus avoid costly duplication of effort.

 


Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Curating Digital Video

Moving image media have distinct characteristics and preservation requirements.  For example, digital moving images often have larger file sizes and exist in a wide range of formats, standards and encoding, with the result that there are few universal standards.  Acquiring production data, workflow documentation, and metadata are additional considerations in developing moving image collections.
 

1. Prepare

2. Identify

3. Select

4. Get

  •  

5. Store

6. Protect

7. Manage

8. Provide


Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

The Ohio State University Libraries (Connell, Dietz & Noonan)

Goal: 
Develop Digital Preservation Policy Framework
Identify issues to be addressed (build on earlier work on TRAC), maybe use Drupal tool

Lisa Lister - Six-month plan

A. Conduct a policy-gap-analysis, including, specifically:

Databib

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Focus: 
Focus: 
Type of resource: 

Databib (http://databib.org) is a searchable catalog of hundreds of research data repositories that includes information about who can submit and reuse data.

Two-Year Research Fellowship in Digital Curation

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Two-Year Research Fellowship in Digital Curation
Journalism and Mass Communication

Simmons GSLIS Launches Online Digital Stewardship Post-Master's Certificate

Focus: 
Focus: 

The Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science is pleased to announce a new post-master's certificate in Digital Stewardship.
 

Simmons GSLIS Launches Online Digital Stewardship Post-Master's Certificate

Focus: 
Focus: 

The Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science is pleased to announce a new post-master's certificate in Digital Stewardship.
 

Simmons GSLIS Launches Online Digital Stewardship Post-Master's Certificate

Focus: 
Focus: 

The Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science is pleased to announce a new post-master's certificate in Digital Stewardship.
 

Managing Business Intelligence Tools To Reduce Data Clutter

In a post directed to efficient management of business intelligence tools, the B-Eye Network highlights that this particula

Simmons GSLIS Launches Online Digital Stewardship Post-Master's Certificate

Focus: 

The Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science is pleased to announce a new post-master's certificate in Digital Stewardship.

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