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Managing Data - Store

Q.

Managing Data - Select

Q: How do I select the most appropriate tools and services for data management?

Collection development policies, preservation policies, and the institution's mission should guide t

Managing Data - Prepare

Q. How do I prepare for data management?

Effective data management involves the implementation of best practices across the entirety of the data lifecycle.

Digitizing - Provide

The primary purpose of most digital collections is to provide user access to the information in the collection.  In order to provide access to your content, you must determine how digital content will be made accessible and who will be allowed to access it.  In order to best provide access to your users, it is important that you understand the needs of the users and their preferred methods for accessing the content you provide.  You will also have to take measures to ensure that the content you provide adheres to copyright and digital rights management laws.

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Digitizing - Manage

Because the landscape of digital content is continually shifting, it requires constant, active management.  Being responsible for a collection of digital content involves the continued management of not just the technology used to store, preserve, and provide access, but also the monetary and human resources.  Managing digital collections requires strong project management skills.  It requires the ability to manage relationships with all of your stakeholders including your user base, those within your department, across departments, your institutional leaders, among other institutions.  As technology changes, it is important to stay abreast of these changes and to be able to adopt new approaches and workflows as necessary. 

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Digitizing - Protect

This doesn't look like the other section pages, but if it's supposed to be a sub-page, doesn't it need to start with a question? (CB)

It is necessary to take active measures to protect your digital content from loss that can take the form of changes, obsolescence, inappropriate access, and disasters.  One of the first lines of defense is to make multiple copies of your content and store them in different locations.  Depending on the resources you have available, you should make at least two copies of your content, and optimally six copies.  You should also monitor your content for inadvertent or deliberate changes by performing checksum procedures that can detect and alert you to even the smallest changes in the digital objects in your collection.  Obsolescence -- or the state of having content in out of date file formats that is difficult to access with available software -- can be avoided by preemptively developing policies to address this issue.  These policies can involve choosing to collect only content in preservation friendly file formats, planning to migrate your content to viable file formats as technology changes, and/or planning to utilize emulation software to provide access to your content over time.  As you are developing your policies during the Prepare stage, you should be sure to also prepare a policy for both technological and physical disaster preparedness. 

 

Take action

  • Make multiple backups of your content (at least two, but optimally six)
  • Perform checksum procedures to detect changes
  • Develop and follow policies to manage obsolescence

 

Watch

(NB: If these videos do not play in a browser such as Firefox, try them in Google Chrome.)

  • "Long Term Digital Preservation (Some Initiatives in India and Germany)."  YouTube, 10:31.  August 17, 2011.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YodX7L17nfI 
    This video captures a PowerPoint presentation by the head librarian of the Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts in New Delhi.  He provides his opinions and what does and does not qualify as digital preservation and gives advice about storage and handling of digital media.  He also describes digitization projects in India and Germany. 
  • Giaretta, David.  "Who Is Doing a Good Job in Digital Preservation?"  YouTube, 25:03.  December 2, 2011. 
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjOAXfsNPK0 
    Proceedings from the APA 2011 conference about the Audit and Certification of Digital Repositories: ISO and the European Framework.  This video captures a PowerPoint presentation made by David Giaretta.  He describes what is wanted from an audit and certification process and what challenges it entails.  He also explains what digital preservation is and the process by which the Repository Audit and Certification working group has generated a system for audits.  He explains the metrics used and those who would be responsible for certification.  He then outlines the steps in the audit process.

 

Review use cases

  • State Library of North Carolina.  "Digital Preservation Education for NC State Government Employees."  Last updated October 15, 2010.  http://digitalpreservation.ncdcr.gov/
    If you create or are responsible for digital materials that you or others will need to access at some point in the future, then you should have a basic understanding of how to care for those files. This site has resources that can help North Carolina state government employees, and users of digital materials in general, learn what they need to know about digital preservation.
  • University of Kentucky Center for Visualization & Virtual Environments. Digital Preservation of Historical Artifacts [http://www.vis.uky.edu/documents.php]
    no sign of this document (CB)
  • National Library of Australia.  "Digital Preservation Policy."  3rd edition, September 2008.  http://www.nla.gov.au/policy-and-planning/digital-preservation-policy
    This policy statement indicates the directions the National Library of Australia takes in preserving its digital collections, and in collaborating with others to enable the preservation of other digital information resources.

 

Read -- all of these are already on the How can I prepare for sustainability and for the future? page

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Digitizing - Store

Once you have selected your digital content, you will have to determine how your content should be stored for the long-term. When you are planning for the storage of your digital content, you will need to consider cost of storage, quantity of storage devices, level of expertise necessary, partners you have or may want to work with, and the services that you want to build from what you have stored.  Also remember that in order to have accessible, sustainable digital content, you will need to create and store various kinds of metadata either with or linked to your digital content.

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Digitizing - Select

After a thorough appraisal of the digital content you have and will be acquiring, you will need to select the content you will manage and preserve. As part of this process, you should assess your institutional and departmental mission statements and determine if the content in question fits within your mission. You will also need to determine if the content has value to your institution, if it's feasible to preserve the content, and if you can provide reliable access of the content to your users. Once you have determined what content you will accept and process, document the selection choices you have made as well as who is permitted access to the content. 

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Digitizing - Prepare

Preparing for any digital curation activity involves having a firm understanding of all elements involved.  You will need to have a clear view of the monetary, human, and technological resources you will need and what you have available. You will also need to have a clear set of goals and objectives and an evaluation methodology so you can assess if you have been successful.  It is always a good idea to do formal needs and resource assessments before you begin and to prepare clearly defined policies for each part of your digital curation workflow.

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

Building IRs - Provide

Q: How do I provide access to materials in my IR?

The primary purpose of most digital collections is to provide user access to the information in the collection.  In order to provide access to your content, you must determine how digital content will be made accessible and who will be allowed to access it.  In order to best provide access to your users, it is important that you understand the needs of the users and their preferred methods for accessing the content you provide. In addition, you will have to determine the best way to promote your IR and help others discover it.

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

Building IRs - Manage

Q: How do I maintain a trustworthy IR into the future?

Being responsible for an institutional repository involves the continued management of not just the technology used to store, preserve, and provide access to content, but also the monetary and human resources. Because the IR environment is continuously shifting, it requires constant, active management. 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

Building IRs - Protect

Q: How do I build a trustworthy IR?

It is necessary to take active measures to protect your digital content from loss that can take the form of changes, obsolescence, inappropriate access, and disasters.  One of the first lines of defense is to make multiple copies of your content and store them in different locations.  Depending on the resources you have available, you should make at least two copies of your content, and optimally six copies. You should also monitor your content for inadvertent or deliberate changes by performing checksum procedures that can detect and alert you to even the smallest changes in the digital objects in your collection.  Obsolescence -- or the state of having content in out of date file formats that is difficult to access with available software -- can be avoided by preemptively developing policies to address this issue. These policies can involve choosing to collect only content in preservation friendly file formats, planning to migrate your content to viable file formats as technology changes, and/or planning to utilize emulation software to provide access to your content over time.  As you are developing your policies during the Prepare stage, you should be sure to also prepare a policy for both technological and physical disaster preparedness. 

Explore

  • Digital Curation Centre (DCC) "Repository Audit and Assessment" [Link]

"The DCC has produced a list of online tools and methodologies for the audit, assessment, and certification of digital repositories."

The DCC has produced a list of online tools and methodologies for the audit, assessment and certification of digital repositories. - See more at: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/repository-audit-and-assessment/repositor...

The DCC has produced a list of online tools and methodologies for the audit, assessment and certification of digital repositories. - See more at: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/repository-audit-and-assessment/repository-audit-and-assessment#sthash.IGiMjejb.dpuf
The DCC has produced a list of online tools and methodologies for the audit, assessment and certification of digital repositories.  - See more at: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/repository-audit-and-assessment/repository-audit-and-assessment#sthash.IGiMjejb.dpuf
The DCC has produced a list of online tools and methodologies for the audit, assessment and certification of digital repositories.  - See more at: http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/repository-audit-and-assessment/repository-audit-and-assessment#sthash.IGiMjejb.dpufWatch

Read

  • Ferriero, David. “ISO Standards for Certifying Trustworthy Digital Repositories.” NARAtions: Blog of the Archivist of the United States. (March 15, 2011) [Link]

"NARA...hosted a meeting of the Working Group that is developing ISO (International Organization for Standardization) standards for use in certifying trustworthy digital repositories.  The two draft ISO standards are ISO/DIS 16363  – Audit and certification of trustworthy digital repositories and ISO/DIS 16919  – Requirements for bodies providing audit and certification of candidate trustworthy digital repositories."

  • Ross, Seamus and Andrew McHugh. “The Role of Evidence in Establishing Trust in Repositories.” D-Lib Magazine 12 7/8 (July/August 2006). [Link]

"This article arises from work by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) Working Group examining mechanisms to roll out audit and certification services for digital repositories in the United Kingdom. Our attempt to develop a program for applying audit and certification processes and tools took as its starting point the RLG-NARA Audit Checklist for Certifying Digital Repositories. Our intention was to appraise critically the checklist and conceive a means of applying its mechanics within a diverse range of repository environments. We were struck by the realization that while a great deal of effort has been invested in determining the characteristics of a 'trusted digital repository', far less effort has concentrated on the ways in which the presence of the attributes can be demonstrated and their qualities measured. With this in mind we sought to explore the role of evidence within the certification process, and to identify examples of the types of evidence (e.g., documentary, observational, and testimonial) that might be desirable during the course of a repository audit."

  • Trusted Digital Repositories: Attributes and Responsibilities.  Mountain View, CA: RLG, 2002. [Link

"In this report the working group has articulated a framework of attributes and responsibilities for trusted, reliable, sustainable digital repositories capable of handling the range of materials held by large and small research institutions. The framework is broad enough to accommodate different situations, architectures, and institutional responsibilities while providing a basis for the expectations of a trusted repository."

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

Building IRs - Store

Q: How do I best store the content in my IR?

Once you have selected your digital content, you will have to determine how your content should be stored for the long-term.  When you are planning for the storage of your digital content, you will need to consider cost of storage, quantity of storage devices, level of expertise necessary, partners you have or may want to work with, and the services that you want to build from what you have stored.

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

Building IRs - Select

Q: How do I align my collection development policy with stakeholder needs?

After appraising of the content you have and will be acquiring, you will need to select the content you will

Archiving Web Sites - Prepare

Preparing for digital curation activities involves having a firm understanding of all elements involved.  You will need to have a clear view of the monetary, human, and technological resources you need and what you have available.  It is always a good idea to do formal needs and resource assessments before you begin and to prepare clearly defined policies for each part of your digital curation workflow.

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

Archiving Web Sites - Provide

The primary purpose of most digital collections is to provide user access to the information in the collection.  In order to provide access to your content, you must determine how digital cont

Archiving Web Sites - Protect

It is necessary to take active measures to protect your digital content from loss that can take the form of changes, obsolescence, inappropriate access, and disasters.  One of the first lines of defense is to make multiple copies of your content and store them in different locations.  Depending on the resources you have available, you should make at least two copies of your content and optimally six copies.  You should also monitor your content for inadvertent or deliberate changes by performing checksum procedures that can detect and alert you to even the smallest changes in the digital objects in your collection.  Obsolescence -- or the state of having content in out-of-date file formats that are difficult to access with available software -- can be avoided by preemptively developing policies to address this issue.  These policies can involve choosing to collect only content in preservation-friendly file formats, planning to migrate your content to viable file formats as technology changes, and/or planning to utilize emulation software to provide access to your content over time.  As you are developing your policies during the Prepare stage, you should be sure to also prepare a policy for both technological and physical disaster preparedness. 

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Archiving Web Sites - Store

Once you have selected your digital content, you will have to determine how your content should be stored for the long-term.  When you are planning for the storage of your digital content, you will need to consider cost of storage, quantity of storage devices, level of expertise necessary, partners you have or may want to work with, and the services that you want to build from what you have stored.  Also remember that in order to have accessible, sustainable digital content, you will need to create and store various kinds of metadata either with or linked to your digital content.

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

Archiving Web Sites - Select

After a thorough appraisal of the digital content you have and will be acquiring, you will need to select the content you will manage and preserve.  As part of this process, you should assess your institutional and departmental mission statements and determine if the content in question fits within your mission.  You will also need to determine if the content has value to your institution, if it's feasible to preserve the content, and if you can provide reliable access of the content to your users.  Once you have determined what content you will accept and process, document the selection choices you have made as well as who is permitted access to the content. 

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

Access 2011

Focus: 
Focus: 
Focus: 
Date: 
Wednesday, October 19, 2011 (All day) - Saturday, October 22, 2011 (All day)

 

ASIS&T 2011 Annual Meeting

Focus: 
Date: 
Sunday, October 9, 2011 (All day) - Wednesday, October 12, 2011 (All day)

 

Association for Recorded Sound Collections (ARSC) 2012 Conference

Focus: 
Focus: 
Date: 
Wednesday, May 16, 2012 (All day) - Saturday, May 19, 2012 (All day)

7th International Digital Curation Conference

Focus: 
Focus: 
Focus: 
Date: 
Monday, December 5, 2011 (All day) - Sunday, December 11, 2011 (All day)

 

Digital Library Federation 2011 Forum

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Focus: 
Date: 
Sunday, October 30, 2011 (All day) - Wednesday, November 2, 2011 (All day)

 

Code4Lib 2012

Focus: 
Focus: 
Date: 
Monday, February 6, 2012 (All day) - Thursday, February 9, 2012 (All day)

The Orbis-Cascade Alliance and the University of Washington Libraries welcome you to the 2012 Code4Lib Conference in Seattle.

Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (JCDL) 2012

Focus: 
Focus: 
Focus: 
Date: 
Sunday, June 10, 2012 (All day) - Thursday, June 14, 2012 (All day)

 

SAA 2012 Annual Meeting

Focus: 
Focus: 
Focus: 
Focus: 
Date: 
Sunday, August 5, 2012 (All day) - Sunday, August 12, 2012 (All day)

iPRES 2011 - 8th International Conference on Preservation of Digital Objects

Focus: 
Focus: 
Date: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2011 (All day) - Friday, November 4, 2011 (All day)

 

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