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Building IRs - Marketing [remove]

What archival principles are useful in building an institutional repository?

Take action

  • Identify archival principles from the literature and consider how they apply to your IR.

Read

  • Gilliland-Swetland, Anne J.  Enduring Paradigm, New Opportunities: The Value of the Archival Perspective in the Digital Environment.  Washington, DC: Council on Library and Information Resources. 2000. [Link]

"This report examines the experiences and contributions of the archival community—practicing archivists, manuscript curators, archival academics, and policy makers who work to define and promote the social utility of records and to identify, preserve, and provide access to documentary heritage regardless of format.  The report addresses how the archival science perspective can make a major contribution to a new paradigm for the design, management, preservation, and use of digital resources."

  • Lavoie, B. “The Open Archival Information System Reference Model: Introductory Guide.” DPC Technology Watch Report Series 04-01. 2004. [Link]

"The central concept in the reference model is that of an open archival information system (OAIS). The term open refers to the fact that the reference model was developed and released in an open public forum, in which any interested party was encouraged to participate. An archival information system is 'an organization of people and systems that has accepted the responsibility to preserve information and make it available for a Designated Community.' This definition emphasizes two primary functions for an archival repository: first, to preserve information – i.e., to secure its long-term persistence – and second, to provide access to the archived information, in a manner consistent with the needs of the OAIS’s primary users..."

  • Lee, Christopher A. “Open Archival Information System (OAIS) Reference Model.” In Encyclopedia of Library and Information Sciences, Third Edition, edited by Marcia J. Bates and Mary Niles Maack.  Boca Raton, FL: CRC

"The Reference Model for an Open Archival Information System (OAIS) describes components and services required to develop and maintain archives, in order to support long-term access to and understanding of the information in those archives. This entry discusses the context in which the OAIS was initiated and provides a chronology of the OAIS development process, including its transformation from a space data standard into a document of much wider scope."

  • Millar, Laura. Archives: Principles and Practices. New York, NY: Neal-Schuman, 2010.

"Divided into four easy-to-follow parts, this authoritative handbook from experienced archivist Laura A. Millar addresses the contextual, strategic, operational, and practical issues associated with creating an archival program. Millar covers the critical topics you need to know to improve your professional skills, including: establishing principles, policies, and procedures managing day-to-day operations caring for different types of archival materials enhancing outreach and public access ensuring the growth and sustainability of the institution and its services."

  • O’Meara, Erin, and Meg Tuomala. 2012. “Finding Balance Between Archival Principles and Real-Life Practices in an Institutional Repository.” Archivaria 73 (April): 81–103. [Link]

"Today’s archivists struggle to find a balance between theory and practice in their professional duties, especially when tasked with designing and implementing an institutional repository. This article explores the intersections between theory and real-life practice through a discussion of relevant archival theory and realistic advice, and an examination of how some of these theories were, or were not, applied in the development of the Carolina Digital Repository (CDR), the institutional repository at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC)."

  • Ross, Seamus.  "Digital Preservation, Archival Science and Methodological Foundations for Digital Libraries."  Keynote Address at the 11th European Conference on Digital Libraries (ECDL), Budapest (17 September 2007). [Link]
"Building on the work of Digital Preservation Europe (DPE) and the Digital Preservation Cluster of DELOS and taking the theoretical framework of archival science as bedrock, this paper investigates digital preservation and its foundational role if digital libraries are to have long‐term viability at the centre of the global information society."

 


Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

What are my options in terms of technology, infrastructure, and software?

Take action

  • Review your options with relevant stakeholders such as decision-makers, IT staff, processing staff, and users.
  • Choose software.
  • If you are coming into an IR that has already been started, figure out why certain technologies have been chosen and whether or not they are set in stone.
  • Perform continual analysis of workflow and software.
  • Update and revise IR workflow and software implementation as necessary.

Explore

  • Digital Commons [Link]

"Digital Commons is the leading hosted institutional repository software for universities, colleges, law schools, and research centers. A Digital Commons repository showcases the breadth of scholarship produced at an institution - everything from faculty papers, student scholarship, and annual reports to open-access journals, conference proceedings, and monographs."

"DSpace is freely available as open source software. (...) DSpace preserves and enables easy and open access to all types of digital content including text, images, moving images, mpegs and data sets."

"An EPrints institutional repository is an information hub designed to capture research outputs, make them discoverable and re-usable, and preserve them for the future. EPrints will take care of all your digital objects, from PDF to data sets."

"The Fedora Repository software has been installed by institutions, worldwide, to support a variety of digital content needs.  The Fedora Repository is extremely flexible and can be used to support any type of digital content.   There are numerous examples of Fedora being used for digital collections, e-research, digital libraries, archives, digital preservation, institutional repositories, open access publishing, document management, digital asset management, and more."

  • Free IR Software [Link]

"This is a category of articles relating to institutional repository software which can be freely used, copied, studied, modified, and redistributed by everyone that obtains a copy: "free software" or "open source software". Typically, this means software which is distributed with a free software license, and whose source code is available to anyone who receives a copy of the software."

Watch

  • Galloway, Patricia.  "Preparing to Build an IR: Getting Started in DSpace."  YouTube, 3:37.  Posted by CDCGUNC.  March 21, 2013.

"Patricia Galloway is an Associate Professor at the University of Texas at Austin School of Information. She reflects on how she began an institutional repository using DSpace."

Read

  • Barton, Mary R. and Margaret M. Waters.  "Choosing an institutional repository software platform" Chapter 3 in Creating an Institutional Repository: LEADIRS Workbook.  MIT Libraries, 2004-2005, p. 66-88. [Link]
The Learning About Digital Institutional Repositories Seminars programme (LEADIRS) aims to describe and illustrate how to build an online institutional repository.  This workbook supplements the seminar presentations and offers practical advice as well as work sheets you can use to get started with your own repository programme.  Where possible, it points you to real-world examples of planning aids or presentations used by university library teams in the UK and around the world.
  • Crow, Raym.  A Guide to Institutional Repository Software. 3rd ed.  New York: Open Society Institute, 2004. [Link
The Open Society Institute intends this guide to help organizations with one facet of their repository planning: selecting the software system that best satisfies their institution’s needs.  These needs will be driven by each institution’s content policies and by the various administrative and technical procedures required to implement those policies.  Therefore, this guide is designed for institutions already familiar with the various administrative, policy, and related planning issues relevant to implementing an institutional repository.  Organizations just starting their evaluation of the benefits and features offered by an institutional repository should first refer to the growing background literature as a context for using this guide.
  • DiLauro, Tim. "Choosing the Components of a Digital Infrastructure." First Monday 9, no. 5 (2004). [Link]
The purpose of this paper is to highlight some issues and help inform the choices associated with developing digital environments within a single institution or among many. While the bulk of this discussion focuses on digital repositories as a key component of the digital infrastructure, persistent identifiers, assumptions surrounding digital preservation, and integration of digital library services are also discussed.
  • Marill, Jennifer and Edward C. Luczak.  "Evaluation of Digital Repository Software at the National Library of Medicine.  D-Lib Magazine 15 no. 5/6 (2009). [Link]
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Library of Medicine® (NLM) undertook an 18-month project to evaluate, test and recommend digital repository software and systems to support NLM's collection and preservation of a wide variety of digital objects.  This article outlines the methodology NLM used to analyze the landscape of repository software and select three systems for in-depth testing.  Finally, the article discusses the evaluation results and next steps for NLM.  This project followed an earlier NLM working group, which created functional requirements and identified key policy issues for an NLM digital repository to aid in building NLM's collection in the digital environment.
  • Prudlo, Marion.  "E-Archiving: An Overview of Some Repository Management Software Tools."  Ariadne 43 (2005). [Link
This article discusses LOCKSS, EPrints and DSpace, which are some of the most widely known repository management tools, in terms of who uses them, their cost, underlying technology, the required know-how, and functionalities.


Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

Digitizing - Authenticity

Q. How should I deal with issues of trust and authenticity?

Though the concepts of trust and authenticity are different, they often work hand in hand. In order to establish trust in a digital collection, you must be able to prove the authenticity of the items in the collection. Authenticity is established by being able to produce the evidence that the item is what you say it is. In digitization efforts, this involves – at the very least – retaining information about the original document,and how and where it was scanned in your metadata records. Using a preservation standard such as PREMIS can make these tasks easier.

 

Take action

  • Collect and store information about the physical item's history (provenance)
  • Collect and store information about how the item was digitized

 

Read

Calls for further definition of requirements for digital authenticity and the associated assessment of mechanisms being offered in order to hasten the development of trusted and widely adopted solutions.
Arose from a project intended to begin a discussion among different communities that have a stake in the authenticity of digital information and to create a common understanding of key concepts surrounding authenticity and of the terms various communities use to articulate them.
Designed as a set of criteria to facilitate the certification of digital repositories as being trustworthy.
Includes a position paper, interviews, feedback from an expert roundtable, and a case study.
From the Abstract: "This paper proposes steps that the institution can take to insure the availability of authentic digital objects in the future.  In this proposal, authenticity is based on definitions from archival diplomatics and relies on methods from public key cryptography for digitally signing an object with a secure time stamp. Trustworthy processes, re-definition of traditional roles, and the implementation of technologies to support authenticity are all required to meet the needs of digital scholarship.  Implementation and policy issues are discussed with specific attention to transformations required of the archival institution and the professional archivist."
  • Kelton, K., Fleischmann, K., & Wallace, W. Trust in Digital Information. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. Volume 59, no. 3 (2008): 363–374.
 
  • MacNeil, Heather. Legal, Historical, and Diplomatic Perspectives. Dordrecht, Boston, London: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2000.
 
Describes two sets of requirements: one includes requirements that support the presumption of the authenticity of electronic records before they are transferred to the preserver’s custody; the other includes requirements that support the production of authentic copies of electronic records after they have been transferred to the preserver’s custody.
Explores the role of evidence within the certification process for trusted digital repositories and identifies examples of the types of evidence that might be desirable during the course of a repository audit.
Describes the rules, standards, and procedures the UN follows when digitizing records. This standard focuses on maintaining record authenticity.

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

How can I prepare for sustainability and for the future?

Explore

Library of Congress: Sustainability of Digital Formats guide
http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/formats/index.shtml

"Digital Disaster Planning: Get the Picture Before Losing the Picture"
“Stewards of digital content, like stewards of analog content, must plan for catastrophe in advance in order to minimize loss and recover quickly. True, digital disasters may occur infrequently. But at the scale that institutions collect digital content and for the length of time that institutions wish to preserve digital content the risk of a disaster is non-trival.”
http://blogs.loc.gov/digitalpreservation/2012/07/digital-disaster-planning-get-the-picture-before-losing-the-picture/

Watch

Bridging Digital and Physical Preservation
About digital surrogates
http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/multimedia/videos/waldseemuller.html

Read

Explains the short-term goals for digitization under a given grant as well as the long-term goals for continuing digitization.
  • Barton, M. and J. Walker. “Building a Business Plan for DSpace, MIT Libraries Digital Institutional Repository.” JoDI 4/2 (May 2003). http://jodi.ecs.soton.ac.uk/Articles/v04/i02/Barton/ & http://jodi.ecs.soton.ac.uk/Articles/v04/i02/Barton/barton-final.pdf
    not sure how to redirect these links (CB)
  • Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access.  “Sustainable Economics for a Digital Planet: Ensuring Long-Term Access to Digital Information.”  February 2010.  http://brtf.sdsc.edu/biblio/BRTF_Final_Report.pdf
    Provides general principles and actions to support long-term economic sustainability; context-specific recommendations tailored to specific scenarios analyzed in the report; and an agenda for priority actions and next steps, organized according to the type of decision maker best suited to carry that action forward.  Focus especially on the Executive Summary.  See also the BRTF website at http://brtf.sdsc.edu/about.html for more information about the project.
  • Eakin (now Richards), Lorraine, Amy Friedlander, and Roger Schonfeld.  “A Selective Literature Review on Digital Preservation Sustainability.”  December 2008.  http://brtf.sdsc.edu/biblio/Cost_Literature_Review.pdf
    Provides a baseline understanding of the current state of research into and practice in the sustainability of digital preservation, particularly regarding the concrete components that drive costs in the area of digital preservation.
  • LaVoie, Brian and Lorcan Dempsey.  “Thirteen Ways of Looking at…Digital Preservation.”  D-Lib Magazine 10 no. 7/8 (2004).  doi: 10.1045/july2004-lavoie.  http://www.dlib.org/dlib/july04/lavoie/07lavoie.html
    Looks at digital preservation as (1) an ongoing activity, (2) a set of agreed outcomes, (3) an understood responsibility, (4) a selection process, (5) an economically sustainable activity, (6) a cooperative effort, (7) an innocuous activity, (8) an aggregated or disaggregated service, (9) a complement to other library services, (10) a well-understood process, (11) an arm's length transaction, (12) one of many options, and (13) a public good.  This article is also cited on the Digitization - Planning page.
  • National Library of Australia.  "Digital Preservation Policy."  3rd edition, 2008.  http://www.nla.gov.au/policy-and-planning/digital-preservation-policy
    This policy statement indicates the directions the National Library of Australia takes in preserving its digital collections, and in collaborating with others to enable the preservation of other digital information resources.
  • Mervis, Jeffrey.  “NSF to Ask Every Grant Applicant for Data Management Plan.”  ScienceInsider (May 5, 2010).  http://news.sciencemag.org/scienceinsider/2010/05/nsf-to-ask-every-grant-applicant.html
    Reports on the move by the NSF and other federal agencies to emphasize the importance of community access to data.
  • "Sustainability: Models for Long-Term Funding."  Chap. 11 in NINCH Guide to Good Practice.  National Initiative for a Networked Cultural Heritage, October 2002.  http://www.nyu.edu/its/pubs/pdfs/NINCH_Guide_to_Good_Practice.pdf (click on Chapter XI in the Table of Contents). 
    Looks first at the funding issues in detail and then discusses planning strategies and methods of sustaining resources through use.
  • Reiger, Oya.  “Project to Programs: Developing a Digital Preservation Policy.”  In Moving Theory into Practice: Digital Imaging for Libraries and Archives, edited by Anne R. Kenney and Oya Reiger, 135-52.  Mountain View, CA: Research Library Group, 2000. 
    This book discusses selection strategies, digital image creation, quality control, image management, use of metadata, rights management, access control, and preservation.
  • Zorich, Diane M.  A Survey of Digital Cultural Heritage Initiatives and Their Sustainability Concerns. Washington, D.C.: Council on Library and Information Resources, June 2003.  http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub118/reports/pub118/pub118.pdf
    In 2002, CLIR commissioned a survey of North American-based digital cultural heritage initiatives (DCHIs).  The purpose of the survey was to identify the scope, financing, organizational structure, and sustainability of DCHIs.  To gain a funder's perspective on these initiatives, the survey also included a few public and private funding organizations that support projects with a digital cultural heritage component.  The survey was a preliminary step in a larger effort aimed at developing recommendations for a coordinated strategy to sustain and strengthen digital cultural heritage initiatives and their by-products.

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Digitizing - Quality

Q. How can I ensure quality control and quality assurance?

Nothing was really here.. adding more content. 

 

Take action

 

 

Review use cases

  • Digital Library of Georgia.  "Digitization Guide."  July 2001.  http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/guide.html
    This guide is designed to give an overview of the digitization process for historical documents such as manuscripts, photographs, books, printed materials, and other flat paper items.  It is intended to cover the basics of digitization projects in a concise manner.  Links to more in-depth information are found throughout the guide, and a list of resources appears at the end.

 

Read

  • "Quality Control and Assurance."  Chap. 8 in NINCH Guide to Good Practice.  National Initiative for a Networked Cultural Heritage, October 2002.  http://www.nyu.edu/its/pubs/pdfs/NINCH_Guide_to_Good_Practice.pdf (click on Chapter VIII in the Table of Contents). 
    Discusses some of the most effective methods of Quality Control and Assurance.
  • Riley, Jenn and Kurt Whitsel.  "Practical Quality Control Procedures for Digital Imaging Projects."  OCLC Systems & Services: International Digital Library Perspectives 21 no. 1 (2005).  doi: 10.1108/10650750510578145.  http://www.lib.unc.edu/users/jlriley/publications/imageqc/qc.pdf
    Illustrates a set of quality review processes implemented in the Indiana University Digital Library Program’s Digital Media and Image Center.
  • Cornell University Library.  "Technical Infrastructure."  Chap. 6 in Moving Theory into Practice: Digital Imaging Tutorial, 2000-2003.  http://www.library.cornell.edu/preservation/tutorial/contents.html
    Includes sections on Digitization Chain, Image Creation, File Management, and Delivery.

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Digitizing - File Formats

Q. What file formats should I use?

Before you digitize your physical items, you will need to take some time to determine what digital file format you will safe your output in.  Many institutions save each item in both a preservation and access file format.  The access format is often smaller in size to make it quicker to download or send to the user, and it can be in file formats that are less sustainable.  Preservation file formats should always be long-lasting and are often much bigger than access formats.  The idea is to save the item in a format that can be used far in the future to create new access versions or to migrate to newer and more sustainable file formats as technology changes. c

 

Take action

  • Determine what file formats you will use for your digitized collection

 

Review use cases

  • Arms, Carolyn & Karl Fleischhauer. Sustainability of Digital Formats: Planning for the Library of Congress.
The Digital Formats Web site provides information about digital content formats. The analyses and resources presented here will increase and be updated over time.
At the end of the first section, there are the FCLA preservation ratings for oral history media formats.
This web page contains format considerations and recommendations for creating digital content suited for long-term preservation and use. This information was compiled for users of the Harvard DRS but could be applied more generally to any digital content intended for long-term preservation."

 

Read

This document is one of a series of guidance notes produced by The National Archives, giving general advice on issues relating to the preservation and management of electronic records. It is intended for use by anyone involved in the creation of electronic records that may need to be preserved over the long-term, as well as by those responsible for preservation.This guidance note provides information for the creators and managers of electronic records about file format selection.
"Many digital file formats can be considered for preservation. CENDI agencies, however, are most
concerned with formats that best preserve text documents such as technical reports and journal
articles. For this reason the report focuses on four major formats in the context of document
preservation – TIFF, PDF, PDF/A, and XML."
Describes the quantifiable file format risk assessment method, which can be used to define digital preservation strategies for specific file formats, and intends to inspire other cultural heritage institutions to define their own quantifiable file format evaluation method.
  • Rosenthal, David.  "Format Obsolescence: Assessing the Threat and the Defenses."  Library Hi-Tech 28 no. 2 (2010): 195-210.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/07378831011047613 (subscription required to access this resource)
Aims to examine the approach to format obsolescence, preparing for format migration, that has guided most digital preservation work for the last 15 years; makes the case that the commonly accepted approach to digital preservation devotes resources to activities that are unlikely to be effective.
Ed Pinsent wrote a blog in response to the Malcolm Todd report.  Rusbridge responded on December 7, 2009, and raised questions about lossy migration; Ashley responded on December 8, 2009, and added some further information about the seminar that led to the Technology Watch Report.
  • Thompson, Dave.  "A Pragmatic Approach to Preferred File Formats for Acquisition."  Ariadne 63 (April 2010).  http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/thompson (subscription required to access this resource)
Sets out the Wellcome Library's decision not explicitly to specify preferred file formats for long-term preservation and discusses a pragmatic approach in which technical appraisal of the material is used to assess the Library's likelihood of preserving one format over another.
Considers various criteria for file formats: adoption, technological dependencies, disclosure, transparency, metadata support, reusability/interoperability, robustness/complexity, stability, intellectual property/digital rights production, the ability of formats to convey content information, extent of format, and cos


Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Digitizing - Storage

Q. What storage media should I use?

In reviewing your options for storing your collection, consider these six criteria when selecting your storage media:

  1. Longevity - your chosen media should have a proven life span of at least ten years
  2. Capacity - make sure that your media can adequately store your the content you have now and the content you plan to collect in the future
  3. Viability - the media you choose should support error detection and data recovery 
  4. Obsolescence - choose technology that is well established and widely available
  5. Cost - consider both the cost for purchasing the media and the cost for maintaining it over time
  6. Susceptibility - the media you choose should show a low susceptibility to data loss and physical damage 

* From: Brown, Adrian.  "Selecting storage media for long-term preservation."  Note 2 in Digital Preservation Guidance.  National Archives, August 2008.  http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documents/selecting-storage-media.pdf.

 

Take action

  • Review storage available to you
  • Review current storage options
  • Choose storage
  • Implement storage
  • Monitor storage

 

Review use cases

  • Library of Congress. Designing Storage Architectures for Digital Preservation. [link]
    not sure how to redirect this broken link (CB)
  • The Science and Technology Council of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.  "The Digital Dilemma: Strategic Issues in Archiving and Accessing Digital Motion Picture Materials."  November 2007.  http://www.oscars.org/science-technology/council/projects/digitaldilemma/
    Requires registration to see the entire PDF report.  Examines ways in which key players in the movie business and other major industries currently store and access important digital data.  The goal was to better understand what problems these industries face today and what, if anything, is being done to avoid full-fledged data access disasters down the road.

 

Read

  • Brown, Adrian.  "Selecting storage media for long-term preservation."  Note 2 in Digital Preservation Guidance.  National Archives, August 2008.  http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documents/selecting-storage-media.pdf
    This document is one of a series of guidance notes produced by The British National Archives, giving general advice on issues relating to the preservation and management of electronic records.  It is intended for use by anyone involved in the creation of electronic records that may need to be preserved over the long term, as well as by those responsible for preservation.
  • Baker, Mary, Kimberly Keeton, and Sean Martin.  "Why Traditional Storage Systems Don’t Help Us Save Stuff Forever."  Palo Alto, CA: HP Laboratories, 2005.  http://www.hpl.hp.com/techreports/2005/HPL-2005-120.pdf
    Describes how storage environments differ and tries to acquaint the dependability community with some of the challenges in building archival storage systems.  Provides guidelines for an alternative storage architecture, much of which is being implemented at the British Library, and concludes with some suggestions for research topics to be tackled in this area.
  • Farmer, Jacob.  "Storage Design for High Capacity and Long Term Storage: Balancing Cost, Complexity and Fault Tolerance."   May 6, 2009.  http://old.diglib.org/forums/spring2009/presentations/Farmer.pdf
    These PowerPoint slides identify the "pain points" for long term storage as well as the costs and include a detailed, technical overview of storage requirements.
  • Wright, Richard, Ant Miller, and Matthew Addis.  "The Significance of Storage in the 'Cost of Risk' of Digital Preservation."  International Journal of Digital Curation 4 no. 3 (2009): 104-22.  http://www.ijdc.net/index.php/ijdc/article/viewFile/138/173
    Examines current modelling of costs and risks in digital preservation, concentrating on the Total Cost of Risk when using digital storage systems for preserving audiovisual material.  Reviews the vital role of storage and show how planning for long-term preservation of data should consider the risks involved in using digital storage technology.  Calls for new functionality to support recovery of files with errors, to eliminate the all-or-nothing approach of current IT systems, which in turn reduces the impact of failures of digital storage technology and mitigates against loss of digital data.

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Digitizing - Project Management

Q. What project management skills do I need?

Managing digitization projects requires strong project management skills.  If you do not have formal project management training, it will be worth your time to read about project management practices or take some classes. 

JISC Digital Media in "Learning Lessons from Other Digitisation Projects" provides the following advice regarding project planning and management:

  • Do your homework before launching into the project – it's vital to carefully assess both your users' needs and your available resources
  • Make sure you have sufficient institutional backing: ensure that the key stakeholders are on your side and that your project is a good fit with your institution's mission and strategic aims
  • Be sure to involve those with knowledge of the collection as well as those with a technical knowledge of digitisation
  • Set clear and achievable objectives and get them down on paper to avoid being diverted or pushed into doing other things ('scope creep')
  • The use of professional project management techniques (e.g. PRINCE2) will help to keep things on track
  • It is important to undertake a risk assessment to help you in monitoring and managing your project's risks
  • Don't underestimate the time required to recruit and train staff, or presume that your staff will stay till the very end of your project

 

Take action

  • Read about project management principles
  • Take project management courses

Read

  • Allan, Barbara.  Project Management: Tools and Techniques for Today's ILS Professional.  London: Facet, 2004.
    Offers in-depth guidance on project management for librarians working alone and for those working in large organizations.  Topics covered include project life cycle and analysis, planning, implementation, evaluation and dissemination, finance, personnel, partnerships, and more.  Allan explores both paper-based and management software approaches to large and small scale project management.
  • Campbell, G. Michael.  Communications Skills for Project Managers.  New York: AMACOM, 2009.
    The number one factor in the success or failure of projects is the quality and consistency of communications.  If you’re a project manager, the bulk of this responsibility falls to you. In Communications Skills for Project Managers, Michael Campbell unlocks this critical component of project success, illustrating how to keep every project stakeholder in the loop every step of the way—from concept through delivery and beyond.  A veteran of countless projects on every conceivable scale, Campbell gives you the universal elements of all communications as they pertain to the specific demands of a project management environment.  And you’ll get a generous selection of powerful tools to help you.
  • Carpenter, Julie.  Project Management in Libraries, Archives and Museums: Working with Government and Other External Partners.  Oxford: Chandos Publishing, 2011.
    Aimed at practitioners and managers, this practical handbook provides a source of guidance on project management techniques for the academic and cultural heritage sectors, focusing on managing projects involving public sector and other external partners.  Issues under consideration and illustration include: different approaches to managing projects and how to select appropriate methods; using project management tools and other applications in project development and implementation; ensuring the sustainability of project outcomes and transferability into practice; realistic monitoring methodologies and specifying and commissioning evaluation work that has real value.
  • Horine, Greg.  Absolute Beginner's Guide to Project Management.  2nd ed.  Indianapolis, IN: Que, 2009.
    "You’ve just been handed your department's biggest project. Absolute Beginner's Guide to Project Management will show you exactly where to start–and walk you step by step through your entire project! Expert project manager Gregory Horine shows you exactly what works and what doesn’t, drawing on the field’s proven best practices. Understand your role as a project manager...gain the skills and discover the personal qualities of great project managers...learn how to organize, estimate, and schedule projects effectively...manage deliverables, issues, changes, risks, quality, vendors, communications, and expectations...make the most of technology...manage virtual teams...avoid the problems that trip up new project managers! This new edition jumpstarts your project management expertise even faster, with all-new insights on Microsoft Project, challenging project situations and intriguing project management topics of the day."
  • JISC Digital Media.  "Project Management for a Digitisation Project." http://www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk/guide/project-management-for-a-digitis...
    From the website: "This paper takes a look at the role and responsibilities of the digitisation project manager. It addresses common managerial challenges such balancing the expectations of stakeholders and ensuring the of quality of output. It is intended to be of use to the management team of time limited digitisation projects or to resource management staff planning to digitise their collection."
  • Mugridge, Rebecca L. Managing Digitization Activities. ARL SPEC Kit 294. Washington, DC: Association of Research Libraries, September 2006. http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/spec294web.pdf
    This SPEC survey was designed to identify the purposes of ARL member libraries; digitization efforts, the organizational structures these libraries use to manage digital initiatives, whether and how staff have been reassigned to support digitization activities, where funding to sustain digital activities originated and how that funding is allocated,how priorities are determined, whether libraries are outsourcing any digitization work, and how the success of libraries’ digital activities has been assessed. The focus of the survey was on the digitization of existing library materials, rather than the creation of born-digital objects.

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Digitizing - User Assessment

Why not in the same format of a question with Read/Take action/etc.? (CB)

 

  • Center for Research Libraries.  "Trustworthy Repositories Audit & Certification: Criteria and Checklist." Version 1.0.  Chicago, Center for Research LIbraries, February 2007.  http://catalog.crl.edu/search~S1?/Xtrusted+repositories&searchscope=1&SORT=R/Xtrusted+repositories&searchscope=1&SORT=R&SUBKEY=trusted%20repositories/1,15,15,B/l856~b2212602&FF=Xtrusted+repositories&searchscope=1&SORT=R&6,6,,1,0
    Envisioned uses of this document include repository planning guidance, planning and development of a certified repository, periodic internal assessment of a repository, analysis of services which hold critical digital content on which institutions rely, and objective third-party evaluation of any repository or archiving service.
  • Ross, Seamus and Andrew McHugh.  “The Role of Evidence in Establishing Trust in Repositories.”  D-Lib Magazine 12 no. 7/8 (July/August 2006).  doi:10.1045/july2006-ross.  http://www.dlib.org/dlib/july06/ross/07ross.html
    This article arises from work by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) Working Group examining mechanisms to roll out audit and certification services for digital repositories in the United Kingdom.  It explores the role of evidence within the certification process and identifies examples of the types of evidence (e.g., documentary, observational, and testimonial) that might be desirable during the course of a repository audit.
  • Digital Curation Centre and DigitalPreservationEurope.  "DRAMBORA."  Last updated February 1, 2008.  http://www.repositoryaudit.eu/
    Digital Repository Audit Method Based On Risk Assessment -- provides information about and access to a toolkit that is intended to facilitate internal audit by providing repository administrators with a means to assess their capabilities, identify their weaknesses, and recognise their strengths.
  • Nestor Working Group on Trusted Repository Certification.  "Catalog of Criteria for Trusted Digital Repositories."  Version 1.0, June 2006.  http://edoc.hu-berlin.de/series/nestor-materialien/8en/PDF/8en.pdf
    The Network of Expertise in long-term STORage produced this draft that identifies criteria which facilitate the evaluation of digital repository trustworthiness, both at organisational and technical levels.
  • Hedstrom, Margaret L., Christopher A. Lee, Judith S. Olson, and Clifford Lampe.  “'The Old Version Flickers More:' Digital Preservation from the User’s Perspective."  American Archivist 69 no. 1 (Spring/Summer 2006): 159-87.  http://archivists.metapress.com/content/1765364485n41800/fulltext.pdf
    Presents the results of two experiments in the CAMiLEON Project that used human subjects to learn about user preferences for different formats of preserved digital objects by testing subjects’ reactions to digital materials that were preserved using three common methods: 1) conversion to a “software-independent” format; 2) migration; and 3) presenting the original bitstream using emulation.
  • Bearman, David and Jennifer Trant.  “Authenticity of Digital Resources: Towards a Statement of Requirements in the Research Process.”  D-Lib Magazine (June 1998).  http://www.dlib.org/dlib/june98/06bearman.html
    Calls for further definition of requirements for digital authenticity in the realm of scholarly digital documentation as well as evaluation of the mechanisms being offered in order to hasten the development of trusted and widely adopted solutions.
  • Lynch, Clifford.  "Authenticity and Integrity in the Digital Environment: An Exploratory Analysis of the Central Role of Trust."  In Authenticity in a Digital Environment, 32-51.  Washington, DC.: CLIR, May 2000.  http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub92/pub92.pdf
    One goal of this paper is to help distinguish between what can be done in code and what must be left for human and social judgment in areas related to authenticity and integrity.  (The other papers in this report also warrant scanning.)
  • "Integrity and Authenticity of Digital Cultural Heritage Objects."  DigiCULT Thematic Issue 1 (August 2002). http://www.digicult.info/downloads/thematic_issue_1_final.pdf
    Includes a position paper, interviews, feedback from an expert roundtable, and a case study.  Focus especially on the Seamus Ross position paper on pp.7-8.
  • InterPARES Project.  “Authenticity Task Force Report.”  The Long Term Preservation of Authentic Electronic Records: Findings of the InterPARES Project.  2002. http://www.interpares.org/book/interpares_book_d_part1.pdf
    The goal of the Authenticity Task Force was to identify conceptual requirements for assessing and maintaining the authenticity of electronic records.  Under the original InterPARES research plan, five questions were to be addressed within the domain of investigation assigned to this task force: (1) What are the elements that all electronic records share?, (2) What are the elements that allow us to differentiate between different types of electronic records?, (3) Of those elements, which will permit us to verify their authenticity over time?, (4) Are the elements for verifying authenticity over time the same as those that permit us to verify their authenticity in time, that is, at the point at which they are originally created and transmitted?, and (5) Is it possible to move the elements from their current position to a place where they can more easily be preserved, without affecting validity?

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Digitizing - Standards and Best Practices

Q. What standards and best practices should I follow?

Numerous standards and best practices exist for a wide range of digitization activities.

Manton Digital Production Manager

Focus: 

 

Manton Digital Production Manager

Dartmouth College Library

BPE 2011 Registration is now open

**Please excuse cross postings**

With what types of data will I be working?

Take action

  • Determine what kind(s) of data you will be managing
  • Review case studies to find examples of data management

Call for Proposals: BPE 2011

Digital Best Practices Exchange 2011

Focus: 
Date: 
Thursday, October 20, 2011 (All day) - Saturday, October 22, 2011 (All day)

Best Practices Exchange 2011

Verifying checksums

Focus: 

Archiving Web Sites - Preservation Challenges

Q. What are the challenges for preserving web sites?

Before you dive in to tackling the challenges of digital preservation, it's good to take a step back and understand the challenges you will be facing. These challenges are technological, financial, and organizational. In order to implement an effective digital preservation program, you need to establish organizational commitment. This means that all levels of your institution should understand and support the digital preservation activities of your unit. This step is key to securing the financial and human resources you need for these activities. Additionally, you will need to have a firm grasp on the technology you will need to preserve your web content. Specifically, you will need to examine and plan for changing technology. 

 

Take action

  • Understand the technological challenges of long-term preservation
  • Understand the financial challenges of long-term preservation
  • Understand the organizational challenges of long-term preservation

 

Read

  • Cornell University Library.  "Digital Preservation Strategies."  Chap. 6 in Digital Preservation Management Tutorial: Implementing Short-term Strategies for Long-term Problems, 2003-2007.   http://www.dpworkshop.org/dpm-eng/conclusion.html
    The conclusion of this guide asserts that an organization's digital preservation program needs to fit defined needs, requirements, and resources, requires ongoing and iterative development, and should reflect best practices and standards.
  • Rothenberg, Jeff.  "Avoiding Technological Quicksand: Finding a Viable Technical Foundation for Digital Preservation."  Council of Library and Information Resources.  January 1998.  http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/rothenberg/contents.html
    This report explores the technical depth of the problem of long-term digital preservation, analyzes the inadequacies of a number of ideas that have been proposed as solutions, and elaborates the emulation strategy.
  • Thibodeau, Kenneth.  “Overview of Technological Approaches to Digital Preservation and Challenges in Coming Years.”  In The State of Digital Preservation: An International Perspective.  Washington, D.C.: Documentation Abstracts, Inc., July 2002.  http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub107/thibodeau.html 

    This report from the Council on Library and Information Resources tries to answer the question, what is a digital object?

  • Kenney, Anne R., et al.  "Preservation Risk Management for Web Resources."  D-Lib Magazine 8 no. 1 (2002).  doi: 10.1045/january2002-kenney.  http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january02/kenney/01kenney.html
    This article describes current Web preservation efforts by libraries and archives and suggests how a new preservation strategy could use a risk management methodology.
  • "Assessing Risk."  Chap. 4 in Archiving Web Resources: Guidelines for Keeping Records of Web-based Activity in the Commonwealth Government National Archives of Australia, 2001.  http://www.naa.gov.au/Images/archweb_guide_tcm16-47165.pdf
    Pages 20-23 in this PDF document factors to consider and determining an acceptable level of risk.

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Archiving Web Sites - Metadata

Q. What kind of metadata do I need for my web archive?

In order to boost accessibility and to aid in preservation, you will need to collect and store metadata with the web content you collect.  Look into collecting and storing administrative, structural, and descriptive metadata.

 

Take action

  • Determine the kinds of metadata you will collect
  • Choose the metadata model you will use
  • Decide how to capture and/or create the metadata

 

Review use cases

  • National Library of Australia.  "Electronic Resources Cataloguing Manual."  2nd ed.  Last updated April 24, 2006.  http://pandora.nla.gov.au/manual/cattoc.html
    Provides a glossary and links to information about cataloguing electronic resources.

 

Review metadata models and standards

  • "Dublin Core Metadata Initiative."  Last updated June 14, 2012.  http://dublincore.org/

    Includes sections on Metadata Basics and DCMI Specifications.

  • Library of Congress.  "Encoded Archival Description" (EAD).  Version 2.0.  Last updated November 1, 2011.  http://www.loc.gov/ead/
    Includes general information about EAD along with schema and a tag library for Version 2.0 as well as Version 1.0.

 

Read

  • Dollar Consulting.  "Metadata Preservation Model."  Appendix 2 in Archival Preservation of Smithsonian Web Resources: Strategies, Principles, and Best Practices.  July 20, 2001.  http://siarchives.si.edu/sites/default/files/pdfs/dollar_report.pdf
    The metadata requirements for tracking and preserving Web sites and HTML pages that are identified in this Appendix draw upon recordkeeping principles and requirements, best archival practices, and the Dublin Core. Specifically, these requirements incorporate the guidelines, recommendations, and best practices identified in the Public Record Office Victoria (Australia) VERS Metadata Scheme, (PROS 99/007 Specification 2), the University of British Columbia study "Protecting the Integrity of Electronic Records," the University of Pittsburgh "Metadata Specifications Derived from Functional Requirements: A Reference Model for Business Acceptable Communications, DOD 5015.2 "Design Specifications for Electronic Records Management Software Applications, and 36 CFR Part 123 (National Archives).  These requirements are organized into three areas: (1) A General Description of the Format; (2) Web site and HTML page identification data; and (3) Preservation data for each Web site and HTML page.
  • International Internet Preservation Consortium (IIPC).  http://netpreserve.org
    The mission of the International Internet Preservation Consortium (IIPC) is to acquire, preserve and make accessible knowledge and information from the Internet for future generations everywhere, promoting global exchange and international relations.  This Web site includes access to numerous reports issued by the IIPC.

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Archiving Web Sites - Selection Criteria

Q. What criteria should I consider for selecting specific web pages to archive?

Once you have determined the general selection approach you would like to take, you can make more specific decisions about how you will select can collect web pages to archive.

 

Take action

  • Develop selection criteria
  • Possible considerations: scope and content of collections, time and frequency of collections, collection type (repeated collection vs. ad-hoc collection vs. one-off collection vs. comprehensive collection)
  • Defining boundary of collection
  • Defining level of collection (page level vs. site level vs. domain level)
  • Identifying entry points (manual vs. automatic)

 

Review use cases

  • National Library of Australia.  "Selection Guidelines."  Last updated April 27, 2011.  http://pandora.nla.gov.au/guidelines.html 
    Links to the selection guidelines of the participating agencies in PANDORA.

 

Read  

  • Brown, Adrian.  "Selection."  Chap. 3 in Archiving Websites: A Practical Guide for Information Management Professionals.  London: Facet Publishing, 2006.
    Outlines the structural, temporal and informational qualities of the Web that influence the selection process.  Elaborates on a diagram of the discrete steps in the selection process, defining various selection methods and criteria.
  • Masanès, Julien.  "Selection for Web Archives."  Chap. 3 in Web Archiving: Issues and Methods, edited by Julien Masanès, 71-91.  New York: Springer, 2006.  http://www.springerlink.com/content/m1q4668m1620944g/ (subscription required to access this resource)
    Covers the three phases of selection: preparation, discovery, and filtering.

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

Archiving Web Sites - Selection Method

Q. How should I select specific web resources to archive?

Selection of web resources is usually based on identifying some entities (e.g., functions, individuals, organizational units, types of transactions) that warrant documentation over time, and then focusing on the subset of the overall universe of documentation that is most likely to serve as documentation of those entities.

Take action

  • Choose appropriate collection methods depending on: types of content, organizations and structures of target content, and relationship between content collectors and content providers.
  • Develop selection criteria
  • Possible considerations: scope and content of collections, time and frequency of collections, collection type (repeated collection vs. ad-hoc collection vs. one-off collection vs. comprehensive collection)
  • Defining boundary of collection
  • Defining level of collection (page level vs. site level vs. domain level)
  • Identifying entry points (manual vs. automatic)

 

Review use cases

  • Hurricanes Katrina and Rita Web Archive http://websearch.archive.org/katrina/ 
    Internet Archive and many individual contributors created a comprehensive list of websites documenting the historic devastation and massive relief effort due to Hurricane Katrina. The sites were crawled between the dates of September 4 - November 8, 2005. This collection, containing more than 61 million searchable documents, will be preserved by Internet Archive with access to historians, researchers, scholars and the general public.
  • Center for History and New Media and American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning.  The September 11 Digital Archive.  http://911digitalarchive.org/ 
    The September 11 Digital Archive uses electronic media to collect, preserve, and present the history of September 11, 2001 and its aftermath. The Archive contains more than 150,000 digital items, a tally that includes more than 40,000 emails and other electronic communications, more than 40,000 first-hand stories, and more than 15,000 digital images. In September 2003, the Library of Congress accepted the Archive into its collections, an event that both ensured the Archive's long-term preservation and marked the library's first major digital acquisition.
  • National Library of Australia.  "Selection Guidelines."  Last updated April 27, 2011.  http://pandora.nla.gov.au/guidelines.html 
    Links to the selection guidelines of the participating agencies in PANDORA.

Watch

  • K-12 Web Archiving: Preserving the Present, http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/multimedia/videos/k12preservingpresent.html
    "Through the K-12 web archiving program, a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the Internet Archive, students — children and teenagers — archive websites that represent their lives and interests. They not only develop critical-thinking skills and learn how to solve problems with others, they also develop an awareness of the transitory nature of web content. The students use Archive-It, a web-based web archiving service from the Internet Archive, to capture sites and manage, describe and browse their collections. The Library of Congress archives the sites the students collect, and those collections become primary sources of information for future researchers. The students' experience of creating primary sources leads them to consider the authenticity and value of other primary sources. In the spring of 2010, a team from the Library of Congress visited one of the program's participating classes at the James Moran Middle School in Wallingford, Connecticut. Over two days Library staff interviewed the students and their teacher, Paul Bogush."

Read

  • Brown, Adrian.  "Selection."  Chap. 3 in Archiving Websites: A Practical Guide for Information Management Professionals.  London: Facet Publishing, 2006.
    Outlines the structural, temporal and informational qualities of the Web that influence the selection process.  Elaborates on a diagram of the discrete steps in the selection process, defining various selection methods and criteria.
  • Lee, Christopher A. "Collecting the Externalized Me: Appraisal of Materials in the Social Web." In I, Digital: Personal Collections in the Digital Era, edited by Christopher A. Lee, 202-238. Chicago, IL: Society of American Archivists, 2011.
    "With the adoption of highly interactive web technologies (frequently labeled 'Web 2.0'), forms of individual documentation and expression also often are inherently social and public. Such online environments allow for personal documentation, but they also engage external audiences in ways not previously possible. This opens up new opportunities and challenges for collecting personal materials, particularly within the context of archival appraisal. This chapter explores various ways in which principles of archival appraisal can be operationalized in an environment in which collecting takes the form of submitting queries and following links."
  • Lee, Christopher A., and Helen R. Tibbo. "Capturing the Moment: Strategies for Selection and Collection of Web-Based Resources to Document Important Social Phenomena." In Archiving 2008: Final Program and Proceedings, June 24-27, 2008, Bern, Switzerland, 300-305. Springfield, VA: Society for Imaging Science and Technology, 2008. http://www.ils.unc.edu/callee/p300-lee.pdf
    "The VidArch project is capturing YouTube videos and web pages associated with the 2008 U.S. presidential election. We are also exploring strategies and building tools for curators of digital collections to appraise and describe such materials. Blogs are an increasingly important source for documenting online deliberations. Blogs can provide commentary, but they can also serve as “contextual information bridges” for identifying and capturing resources to which the pages link. Web archiving literature usually defines collecting in terms of setting up a set of seeds for crawls based on specific URLs. However, a substantial portion of material on the Web is accessible through posing queries. Curators of digital collections will need tools and methods for combining information from queries and crawls to identify and collect materials. The VidArch project is developing and testing such approaches, in order to support what Hans Booms would call a “documentation plan” for reflecting the heterogeneous and interlinked conversation space surrounding contemporary events."
  • Longitudinal Analytics of Web Archive data (LAWA). http://www.lawa-project.eu/
    "To support innovative Future Internet applications, we need a deep understanding of Internet content characteristics (size, distribution, form, structure, evolution, dynamic). The LAWA project on Longitudinal Analytics of Web Archive data will build an Internet-based experimental testbed for large-scale data analytics. Its focus is on developing a sustainable infra-structure, scalable methods, and easily usable software tools for aggregating, querying, and analyzing heterogeneous data at Internet scale. Particular emphasis will be given to longitudinal data analysis along the time dimension for Web data that has been crawled over extended time periods."
  • Masanès, Julien.  "Selection for Web Archives."  Chap. 3 in Web Archiving: Issues and Methods, edited by Julien Masanès, 71-91.  New York: Springer, 2006.  http://www.springerlink.com/content/m1q4668m1620944g/ (subscription required to access this resource)
    Covers the three phases of selection: preparation, discovery, and filtering.
  • Masanès, Julien. "Towards Continuous Web Archiving: First Results and an Agenda for the Future." D-Lib Magazine 8, no. 12 (2002). http://www.dlib.org/dlib/december02/masanes/12masanes.html
    "In this article, I will outline the contribution of the national library of France (BnF)" which "began a research project on Web archiving in late 1999. Our project experiments have been ongoing even as the legal deposit law has been in the process of being updated—a process that has not yet ended. Our work on Web archiving is divided into two parts. The first part is to improve crawlers for continuous and adapted archiving. This means being able to automatically focus the crawler for satisfactory archiving. Apart from getting existing, hands-on tools, this part of our project, which is presented in this article, consists of defining and testing good parameters toward that aim. The second part of our work is testing every step of the process for depositing web content. In our view, deposit is a necessary part of archiving the Web, because a large amount of very rich Web content is out of the reach of crawlers."
  • Masanès, Julien. "Web Archiving Methods and Approaches: A Comparative Study." Library Trends 54, no. 1 (2005): 72-90. http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=19601009
    "This article will present various approaches undertaken today by different institutions; it will discuss their focuses, strengths, and limits, as well as a model for appraisal and identifying potential complementary aspects amongst them. A comparison for discovery accuracy is presented between the snapshot approach done by the Internet Archive (IA) and the event-based collection done by the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (BNF) in 2002 for the presidential and parliamentary elections."
  • Qin, Jialun, Yilu Zhou, and Michael Chau.  "Building domain-specific web collections for scientific digital libraries: a meta-search enhanced focused crawling method."  In Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE-CS joint conference on Digital libraries.  New York, NY: ACM, 2004.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/996350.996383
    Collecting domain-specific documents from the Web using focused crawlers has been considered one of the most important strategies to build digital libraries that serve the scientific community. However, because most focused crawlers use local search algorithms to traverse the Web space, they could be easily trapped within a limited sub-graph of the Web that surrounds the starting URLs and build domain-specific collections that are not comprehensive and diverse enough to scientists and researchers. In this study, we investigated the problems of traditional focused crawlers caused by local search algorithms and proposed a new crawling approach, meta-search enhanced focused crawling, to address the problems. We conducted two user evaluation experiments to examine the performance of our proposed approach and the results showed that our approach could build domain-specific collections with higher quality than traditional focused crawling techniques.
  • Schneider, Steven M., et al.  "Building thematic Web collections: Challenges and experiences from the September 11 Web Archive and the Election 2002 Web Archive."  Paper presented at the 3rd Workshop on Web Archives.  2003.  http://bibnum.bnf.fr/ecdl/2003/proceedings.php?f=schneider
    One method for creating large-scale collections of Web materials is to use a “thematic” approach. In this paper, we introduce the concept of a thematic Web collection, discuss the experience of our organizations which have collaborated in the development and presentation of two thematic Web collections, identify challenges associated with thematic archiving, and comment on the value of thematic archiving from a library, archivist and scholarly perspective.

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

What do I need to know about data management plans?

Take action

  • Identify the components of a good data management plan
  • Determine funding agencies' requirements for data management plans
  • Make all necessary provisions to adhere to your data management plan

 

Explore

  • University of California Curation Center of the California Digital Library. “DMPTool: Guidance and Resources for Your Data Management Plan.” DMPTool, 2013. https://dmp.cdlib.org/.

U.S. funding agencies such as the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health require researchers to supply detailed, cost-effective plans for managing research data, called Data Management Plans. Several universities and organizations are developing the DMPTool to help researchers meet these new requirements.

This document contains the 118 headings and questions that make up the DCC's Checklist for a Data Management Plan (v3.0).  It also includes the default guidance that accompanies the headings and questions in the web-based data management planning tool, DMP Online.

The DCC has analysed UK funders’ policies and developed various data management resources in response.

  • Digital Curation Centre (DCC). “DMP Online: The DCC Data Management Planning Tool.” Accessed October 1, 2013. https://dmponline.dcc.ac.uk/.

DMP Online has been developed by the Digital Curation Centre to help researchers and research support staff produce data management plans (DMPs). These plans are increasingly required by research funders and institutions.

 

Watch

  • Grappone, Todd, and Patricia Cruse. CNI: Data Management Plans Online. San Diego, CA: Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), 2011. http://vimeo.com/23729941.

Todd Grappone (Associate University Librarian, Digital Initiatives and Information Technology at the University of California, Los Angeles) and Patricia Cruse (Director, University of California Curation Center at the California Digital Library) presented at the Coalition for Networked Information Spring 2011 Membership Meeting.
  • Loo, Jeffrey. Preparing Data Management Plans for NSF Grant Applications. Berkeley, CA: University of California Berkeley Science Libraries, 2011. http://youtu.be/Lc82pxxRkMo.

A guide to the NSF policy for data management plans.

 

Read

  • Dietrich, Dianne, Trisha Adamus, Alison Miner, and Gail Steinhart. “De-mystifying the Data Management Requirements of Research Funders.” Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship no. Summer (2012). doi:10.5062/F44M92G2.

As many academic libraries are beginning to offer or are already offering assistance in writing and implementing data management plans, it is important to consider how best to support researchers. Our research examined the current data management requirements of major US funding agencies to better understand data management requirements facing researchers and the implications for libraries offering data management services for researchers.

Reports on the move by the NSF and other federal agencies to emphasize the importance of community access to data.

Provides a list of Recommended Components for a data management plan along with Resources for Creating Plans.

Explains the NSF Data Sharing Policy, the NSF Data Management Plan Requirements, Requirements by Directorate, Office, Division, Program or other NSF Unit, and FAQs.

  • Sallans, Andrew, and Martin Donnelly. “DMP Online and DMPTool: Different Strategies Towards a Shared Goal.” International Journal of Digital Curation 7, no. 2 (December 6, 2012): 123–129. doi:10.2218/ijdc.v7i2.235.

This paper provides a comparative discussion of the strategies employed in the UK’s DMP Online tool and the US’s DMPTool, both designed to provide a structured environment for research data management planning (DMP) with explicit links to funder requirements. Following the Sixth International Digital Curation Conference, held in Chicago in December 2010, a number of US institutions partnered with the Digital Curation Centre’s DMP Online team to learn from their experiences while developing a US counterpart. DMPTool arrived in beta in August 2011 and released a production version in November 2011. This joint paper will compare and contrast use cases, organizational and national/cultural characteristics that have influenced the development decisions, outcomes achieved so far, and planned future developments.

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

How do I ensure that individuals do not misuse the data?

Take action

 

Review use cases and resources

  • Biological Records Centre  http://www.brc.ac.uk/ 
    not clear what is supposed to be reviewed here (CB)

 

Read

  • Van den Eynden, Veerle, Louise Corti, et al.  "Managing and sharing data."  Colchester, UK Data Archive, 2011.  http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/media/2894/managingsharing.pdf

    Section on Anonymising Data (page 26) suggests reasons for de-identifying data and methods for doing so.

  • Lord, Philip and Alison Macdonald.  "e-Science Curation Report: Data curation for e-Science in the UK: an audit to establish requirements for future curation and provision."  Joint Information Systems Committee, 2003.  http://www.jisc.ac.uk/uploaded_documents/e-ScienceReportFinal.pdf 
    This study examined the current provision and future needs of curation of primary research data in the UK, particularly within the e-Science context.  It summarises the strategic and policy analyses and outlines proposals for the organisational structuring of curation provision and provides a table showing which recommendations address the findings.

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

OLD: What other use cases are available?

Additional Use Cases -- why aren't these included on other pages (as Review use cases) rather than listed separately? (CB)

  • CASPAR  http://www.casparpreserves.eu/
    CASPAR: Cultural, Artistic and Scientific knowledge for Preservation, Access and Retrieval is an Integrated Project co-financed by the European Union within the Sixth Framework Programme.  For the programme goals, see http://www.casparpreserves.eu/caspar-project.html.
  • Global Biodiversity Information Facility  http://www.gbif.org/
    The Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) was established by governments in 2001 to encourage free and open access to biodiversity data, via the Internet.  Through a global network of countries and organizations, GBIF promotes and facilitates the mobilization, access, discovery and use of information about the occurrence of organisms over time and across the planet.
  • Donnelly, Martin, Victoria Boyd, and Jill Spellman.  "Integrative Biology."  April 6, 2008.  http://www.dcc.ac.uk/sites/default/files/documents/publications/case-studies/integrative_biology.pdf
    The main aim of the Integrative Biology (IB) project is to realise this potential by developing multi-scale models - spanning the range from genes to whole organs - and to provide data management features for its disparate users including the sharing of data in a secure infrastructure, and enabling the storage and re-use of simulation outputs.
  • Prayor, Graham.  "CARMEN."  September 2008.   http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/case-studies/carmen-0
    This DCC study of CARMEN (Code, Analysis, Repository & Modelling for e-Neuroscience) aimed to provide an understanding the data curation requirements of this sector of the active e-Science community.  It carried a dual objective to identify good practice or proven solutions whilst also informing the DCC’s own tools and services around actual needs and requirements.
  • Lyon, Liz, Chris Rusbridge, et al.  "SCARP."  March 4, 2010.  http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/case-studies/scarp
    The DCC SCARP project investigated attitudes and approaches to data deposit, sharing and reuse, curation and preservation over a range of research fields in differing disciplines. The aim was to investigate research practitioners' perspectives and practices in caring for their research data, and the methods and tools they use to that end.
  • Donnelly, Martin.  "Wide Field Astronomy Unit."  December 8, 2005.  http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/case-studies/wide-field-astronomy-unit-wfau
    The Wide Field Astronomy Unit (WFAU) creates and curates astronomical data, serving a large community of data re-users.
  • Donnelly, Martin.  "MESSAGE."  October 2010.  http://www.dcc.ac.uk/message

    Mobile Environmental Sensing System Across Grid Environments (MESSAGE) was a three-year project funded jointly by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and the UK Department for Transport (DfT).  The rationale behind this mix of funders was "to demonstrate some e-Science concepts that could be applied in a real world scenario."  The project ran from October 2006 to September 2009.

 

Read

  • Donnelly, Martin and Robin North.  "The Milieu and the MESSAGE: Talking to Researchers about Data Curation Issues in a Large and Diverse e-Science Project."  International Journal of Digital Curation 6 no. 1 (2011): 32-44.  http://www.ijdc.net/index.php/ijdc/article/view/161/229
    MESSAGE (Mobile Environmental Sensing System Across Grid Environments) was an ambitious, multi-partner, interdisciplinary e-Science research project, jointly funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and the UK Department for Transport (DfT) between 2006 and 2009.  It aimed to develop and demonstrate the potential of diverse, low cost sensors to provide heterogeneous data for the planning, management and control of the environmental impacts of transport activity at urban, regional and national level.  During the last year of the project, the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) interviewed and observed members of the project team in order to identify and analyse key aspects of their data-related activities, recording attitudes towards the data that they create and/or re-use. This paper describes the major issues identified over the course of the case study, which are presented in parallel with the perspectives of the project team in order to demonstrate the multiplicity of views that may be projected onto a single dataset.  It concludes with a contextualisation of the case study’s themes with those of a number of contemporary reports.
  • Kim, Youngseek, Benjamin K. Addom, and Jeffrey N, Stanton.  "Education for eScience Professionals: Integrating Data Curation and Cyberinfrastructure."  International Journal of Digital Curation 6 no. 1 (2011): 125-138.  http://www.ijdc.net/index.php/ijdc/article/view/168/236
    Large, collaboratively managed datasets have become essential to many scientific and engineering endeavors, and their management has increased the need for “eScience professionals” who solve large scale information management problems for researchers and engineers.  This paper considers the dimensions of work, worker, and workplace, including the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed for eScience professionals.  They used focus groups and interviews to explore the needs of scientific researchers and how these needs may translate into curricular and program development choices.  A cohort of five masters students also worked in targeted internship settings and completed internship logs.  They organized this evidence into a job analysis that can be used for curriculum and program development at schools of library and information science.
  • Whyte, Argus, and Graha, Pryor.  "Open Science in Practice: Researcher Perspectives and Participation." International Journal of Digital Curation 6 no. 1 (2011): 199-213.  http://www.ijdc.net/index.php/ijdc/article/view/173/241
    They report on an exploratory study consisting of brief case studies in selected disciplines, examining what motivates researchers to work (or want to work) in an open manner with regard to their data, results and protocols, and whether advantages are delivered by working in this way.  They review the policy background to open science, and literature on the benefits attributed to open data, considering how these relate to curation and to questions of who participates in science.  The case studies investigate the perceived benefits to researchers, research institutions and funding bodies of utilising open scientific methods, the disincentives and barriers, and the degree to which there is evidence to support these perceptions.  Six case study groups were selected in astronomy, bioinformatics, chemistry, epidemiology, language technology and neuroimaging.  The studies identify relevant examples and issues through qualitative analysis of interview transcripts.  They provide a typology of degrees of open working across the research lifecycle, and conclude that better support for open working, through guidelines to assist research groups in identifying the value and costs of working more openly, and further research to assess the risks, incentives and shifts in responsibility entailed by opening up the research process are needed.
  • Higgins, Sarah.  "Workflow Standards for eScience."  February 2008.  http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/briefing-papers/standards-watch-papers/workflow-standards-e-science
    Sections include Digital Curation and e-Science Workflows, Standards for e-Science Workflow, Functionality, Implementations, Additional Resources, and Related DCC Resources.

 

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

 

What software applications are available to help manage data?

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  • Review case studies that illustrate data management software applications in use

 

How do I ensure that individuals do not misuse the data? [OLD]

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  • Van den Eynden, Veerle, Louise Corti, et al.  "Managing and sharing data."  Colchester, UK Data Archive, 2011.  http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/media/2894/managingsharing.pdf

    Section on Ethics and Consent (pages 22-31) suggests three factors to be considered in gathering research data about people: consent, anonymising data, and controlling access to data.

  • Cornell University Library. "Legal Issues."  Chap. 5 in Digital Preservation Management Tutorial: Implementing Short-term Strategies for Long-term Problems, 2003-2007.  http://www.dpworkshop.org/dpm-eng/challenges/accountability.html

    Provides a brief overview of the legal issues involving copyright along with a case study and some suggested resources.

  • Library of Congress NDIIP, JISC, OAK Law Project, and the SURFfoundation.  "International Study on the Impact of Copyright Law on Digital Preservation."  September 2008.  http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/documents/digital_preservation_final_report2008.pdf

    This study focuses on the copyright and related laws of Australia, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States and the impact of those laws on digital preservation of copyrighted works.  It also addresses proposals for legislative reform and efforts to develop non-legislative solutions to the challenges that copyright law presents for digital preservation.

  • Coyle, Karen.  “Rights in the PREMIS Data Model: A Report for the Library of Congress.”  Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, December 2006.  http://www.loc.gov/standards/premis/Rights-in-the-PREMIS-Data-Model.pdf

    The PREMIS standard contains a rights entity that allows the association of rights with specific digital preservation actions.  This paper looks at the various definitions of rights, the state of rights metadata, and surveys legislative actions taking place in many nations that will provide a legal standing for digital preservation activities.

  • Hirtle, Peter B.  "Digital Preservation and Copyright."  Stanford University Libraries & Academic Information Resources.  http://fairuse.stanford.edu/commentary_and_analysis/2003_11_hirtle.html

    Considers copyright law in the light of making digital preservation copies.

  • Hirtle, Peter.  "Copyright Term and the Public Domain in the United States."  Last updated January 3, 2012.  http://copyright.cornell.edu/resources/docs/copyrightterm.pdf

    This table details U.S. copyright law applications for various types of works as of January 1, 2012.

  • JISC.  "Copyright and Intellectual Property Law."  http://www.jisclegal.ac.uk/LegalAreas/CopyrightIPR.aspx

    JISC Legal offers sector specific guidance and detailed publications to assist you in this area of law, as well as a varied range of FAQs with relevant examples and useful recommended links to other resources.

  • Besek, June M.  "Copyright Issues Relevant to the Creation of a Digital Archive: A Preliminary Assessment."  Council on Library and Information Resources & Library of Congress, January 2003.  http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub112/reports/pub112/pub112.pdf

    This paper describes copyright rights and exceptions and highlights issues potentially involved in the creation of a nonprofit digital archive.

Last updated on 12/31/69, 7:00 pm by Anonymous

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